Legacy’s Creation

History

The creation of Legacy School for Integrated Studies came from the Coalition of Campus Schools Project (CCSP), launched in New York City as part of a broader initiative to create small, new model schools during the early 1990s.[1] The project was part of the Board of Education’s broader school restructuring initiative, begun by Chancellor Joe Fernandez in 1989 and continued through the terms of four subsequent chancellors.[2] This project replaced two large, comprehensive neighborhood high schools with eleven small schools and redesigned the campuses to include a set of small elementary and high schools.[3]  Julia Richman was one of the large, comprehensive high schools that was replaced by six smaller high schools: Coalition School for Social Change, Landmark High School, Manhattan International High School, Manhattan Village Academy, Vanguard High School and Legacy School for the Integrated Studies.  Since, 5 of the 6 schools have remained opened.

When this project began, it was plagued by problems such as lack of funding, space and structural supports for student recruitment.  Late admissions, guidance counselors’ reluctance to recommend schools that did not have a site, and the Board of Education’s complex assignment procedures produced a student body comprised mostly of students who had not applied elsewhere or had been rejected by their chosen schools in the normal admission process.[4] Thus the CCSP student population included much greater proportions of low-income, low-achieving, and limited English-proficient students than the citywide average or the old Julia Richman High School (see Table 1).[5]

 

Since its inception, Legacy School for Integrated Studies has been a place where they have warehoused students who needed the most support. The small schools within this coalition did achieve greater attendance rates, fewer disruptions to the learning time and larger graduation rates.  However, Legacy had left the CCSP because of philosophical differences between the director and other members of the project.  Therefore, the findings about the outcomes from the report do not fully pertain to Legacy.

 

[Where is the data for Legacy during this time? Do parents and students have access to it?] [Insert student/parent perspective of why we bring up the past—history of disinvestment and policies that are mandated rather than created with parents and students that do not work]

 

However, in the Educational Impact Statement, statistics from the last ten years are cited as a reason for closure.

[From Educational Impact Statement] Graduation rates at Legacy have been consistently low for the last ten years. Last year, Legacy’s four-year graduation rate (including August graduates) was just 43%—well below the citywide average of 65.1% and in the bottom 4% of high schools Citywide. (Citywide average is based on the 2010 New York State reported graduation results for NYCDOE students.)

[Where are the graduation rates from the past ten years? How can the community make an informed decision without the appropriate data?]


[1] Reinventing high schools: Outcomes of the Coalition Campus Schools Project http://www.srnleads.org/data/pdfs/reinventing_hs.pdf

[2] Reinventing high schools: Outcomes of the Coalition Campus Schools Project http://www.srnleads.org/data/pdfs/reinventing_hs.pdf

[3] Reinventing high schools: Outcomes of the Coalition Campus Schools Project http://www.srnleads.org/data/pdfs/reinventing_hs.pdf

[4] Reinventing high schools: Outcomes of the Coalition Campus Schools Project http://www.srnleads.org/data/pdfs/reinventing_hs.pdf

[5] Reinventing high schools: Outcomes of the Coalition Campus Schools Project http://www.srnleads.org/data/pdfs/reinventing_hs.pdf